Simple, Easy, and Lucrative?

by Christopher Lovejoy on June 29, 2019

Who might I be and what might I do to attract and manifest a simple and easy yet lucrative way of living that taps and tunes my talents, that delivers significant value, that informs and inspires in perpetuity, and that ultimately fulfills my truest, deepest, most heartfelt desire?

Truth be told, this is a question I could not entertain until now.

Why?

Because I have a rainbow forest mind.

A what?

A rainbow forest mind.

What on earth is that?

Think of a rainforest teeming with life … now think of a vibrant rainbow in a dark blue sky … now think of a mind teeming with ideas, day and night, day after day, week after week, month after month … now think of these ideas as being full of vibrancy … are you getting the point?

And how is this a problem?

Not a problem ~ a challenge, a blessing … and … a burden.

Please, do explain.

Absolutely, and thank you for the opportunity.

You see, it’s a matter of focus; what is my point of focus? What is the One Thing that would guide me to forming a unique value proposition, one that would offer and deliver significant and lasting value?

Okay, but do you really think you can tame your mind to deliver said value?

To be honest, I don’t know, yet, but not knowing need not stop me from trying.

Good answer. So where do you go from here?

Thank you. For starters, I leverage, simply and easily, the incomparable value and strength of having and feeding a rainbow forest mind unique to me and my needs, values, desires, and interests in relation to those who have the very same needs, values, desires, and interests.

Gee, sounds like this could be a complex, difficult proposition.

I don’t think so ~ not if I keep it simple and easy.

But how does a rainbow forest mind get to that One Thing so simply and easily?

With a simple, easy focus on generating and evaluating options over time, through a steady, stable frame of options that can be simply and easily evaluated daily according to level of personal interest.

That sounds too easy.

Here, let me show you:

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With this simple frame, I insert answers in response to contemplating, over time, two rather simple questions: (1) what would I really love to do?; and (2) what would I be really good at doing?

In my daily contemplations, I give myself time to come up with options.

I can see how you’re trying to leverage your strengths.

I can even tweak the frame as follows to foster a laser focus:

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You’re framing the list as two lists ~ a long list and a short list ~ to isolate that One Thing.

Yes. This visual is a simple aid, and a reminder to focus easily and consistently over time.

I can see that, but how do get the answers to your two questions to converge over time?

Great question.

I simply add a daily prompt, as a simple reminder of what I’m looking for, like this:

Not only am I really good at ___________ ,
I also really love doing this much of the time :

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I hate to burst your bubble, but how do you know that these convergences of passionability address, manage, and resolve anything of value that this world actually needs or wants, and even this world needs or wants it, how do you know if you can be paid well for it?

No worries, my dear inquisitor. I simply generate another list.

Please, do share. I have a feeling this is gonna be instructive.

I simply generate another list along the same lines as the first list:

Not only is this a pressing problem,
it also holds the potential to pay well:

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I see, but how does this list connect to the previous list?

I begin by populating my “love this, good at this” list at random with activities that I know I would love to do much of the time; at this point, it doesn’t much matter in which order I place them on the list:

1. reading …
2. writing about …
3. researching …
4. consulting on …
5. counselling …
6. facilitating …
7. photographing …
8. recording …
9. sharing the love …

Then I …

Wait, sharing the love?

Sure, why not? It’s not like this has to be a totally conventional list.

I see, alright, go on …

Then I switch over to the second “this pays well to resolve this pressing problem” list, and populate this list with pressing problems currently in vogue, preferably those problems that I know or sense will (a) dovetail with my interests, and (b) continue to be pressing in perpetuity.

Sounds good, Einstein, but where do you go to find juicy problems?

First, I pick a niche that captures my interest or curiosity, while knowing that this is a “love decision,” not a “logic decision.” Why this niche and not another? Quite simply, because it floats my boat.

You certainly have a way with words. Please, do continue.

Having a niche in hand, I simply explore the niche: know and speak the language of the people in this niche, find out what they’re doing, where they hang out, what problems they face, but most importantly, find out which pressing problems are not being resolved or resolved well.

So, pick a niche, and immerse yourself in said niche to find a juicy problem.

That’s it in a nutshell, yes, and you can do the immersion online and off ~ online, through books and blogs, book reviews and blog comments, videos and video commentary, and offline, through gatherings like conferences, by speaking directly to those in need, by asking how much they’d be willing to pay to have their most pressing issues and problems effectively and efficiently addressed and resolved.

I would appreciate you walking me through the process from start to finish.

Not a problem.

One, start with this extremely powerful question: What is my point of focus? What is the One Thing that would guide me to forming a unique value proposition, one that would offer and deliver significant and lasting value? Just ask the question, no need to answer it just yet.

Two, populate the list that follows with juicy options at your leisure. Take your time. Prioritize as desired. Remember, too, when doing this, you’re not a stone carver; you’re a potter of wet clay:

Not only am I really good at ___________ ,
I also really love doing this much of the time :

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Three, as you populate your “love this, good at this” list, get a sense of which sandbox you’d most like to play. What niche would really get you going and keep you going day after day? Pick a few or more and then whittle it down to that one niche where you’d most like to hang out.

Four, with niche in hand, hang out. Get a sense for the problems. More to the point, get a sense for any pressing and significant problems that are not being addressed or resolved in any meaningful or effective way, and then populate the list that follows, prioritizing as desired …

Not only is this a pressing problem,
it also holds the potential to pay well:

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Do I have to fill the entire list with options?

Not at all. Remember, it’s just a frame, a way to structure your thinking. You might only be able to come up with five options, or even just three, and this is fine, as long as you get to that One Thing.

Got it. What’s next?

Go straight to the problem, making sure that it’s pressing, relevant, and significant to a group of people who are willing to pay the big bucks to have it effectively and efficiently addressed and resolved.

But I’m no expert!

Dude, this isn’t about being an expert; it’s about making the time to become a little better at something than your audience and knowing just enough to respond effectively to a pressing problem, with knowledge and know-how that could be easily acquired in 30 days or less. No one is going to pay you to be smart or to know it all; you’re only getting paid to address a perceived problem with a desired result.

Sounds like a lot of work.

I grant you, it might be, or it might not; that’s up to you. But even if it is, you’d be doing something you love to do and do well, remember? And know this, too: there’s no end to significant pressing problems.

You make it sound so easy.

Why shouldn’t it be so easy?

What if I go through the process and find out I have nothing significant to offer?

Simply wait a while and go back to it when you feel ready to have another go.

I bet you practice what you preach.

This stuff is way too important to leave to chance.

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